Indian-American attorney appointed to lead US civil rights division

Indian-American lawyer Vanita Gupta to lead its civil rights division The US justice department has appointed Indian-American lawyer Vanita Gupta to lead its civil rights division that is charged with implementing laws which preclude discrimination and other unjust exercises in education, employment and housing. According to an official statement from The Department of Justice (DoJ), Ms. Gupta would take on the responsibility of Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General and Acting Assistant Attorney General from October 20 at the division. She would succeed Molly Moran, who will be appointed as Principal Deputy Associate Attorney General. Attorney General Eric Holder, announcing her appointment, said “Vanita has spent her entire career working to ensure that our nation lives up to its promise of equal justice for all”. Gupta was born to immigrant parents in the Philadelphia region. She was conferred from Yale University a BA, magna cum laude. She received JD from the New York University School of Law. As a lawyer, she began her career with the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Since 2008 at New York University School of Law, she has also taught civil rights litigation and advocacy clinics. Before joining the justice department, she had been the legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union. She also served as the director of its Center for Justice. Earlier, she served as an attorney for the Racial Justice Program of the same institution. Gupta, through her collaboration with the ACLU, has been involved in reform initiatives throughout the nation concerning criminal law, drug policy, sentencing and federal and state policing. In recent days, her work has concentrated on creating...

Anti-spam law will affect software makers from January

Canadian anti-spam law The controversial anti-spam law in Canada has already compelled businesses to change their email communication with customers. However, the law will also begin to target software manufacturers from early next year. From Jan. 15, 2015, companies will need to obtain consent prior to setting up any software on the computer of an individual in case the application is able to send electronic messages in a covert manner or consists of some other functionality delineated in the law. Companies also need to reveal to users clearly whether the application can gather personal details change data, preferences or settings on the system, allow some third party to access the system, interfere with the usual operations of the computer or intervene with the usual operations of your computer. According to the law, the disclosure has to be delineated prominently, clearly and separately and “apart from the license agreement.” The law has been framed to lash out at the makers of spyware and malware. However, it can also affect software firms that are legitimate and for non-compliance even such companies can face fines of up to $10 million. However, the law exempts JavaScript code, HTML, web cookies, operating systems and software upgrades or updates in case a firm can prove that a user has consented to setting up the program prior to its installation. The legislation, as expected, set off a debate and opposing reactions from all quarters. The legislation is supported by the likes of Michael Geist, a professor at the University of Ottawa and the Canada Research Chair in Internet and E-commerce Law. According to him customers are...